Guacamole Salad

FDC Member Betsey Benagh noticed a lot of Kale on the swap table and sent in this recipe to share. She says she’s tried kale lots of ways, but this is the only preparation everyone in her family eats willingly, and enjoys!
Originally, the recipe came from an FDC newsletter years ago, but she has since lost the original attribution. Her family calls it “Guacamole Salad”. Bestey implores, “If you think you hate kale, please give it a try!”

 

Ingredients:
1 bunch kale
1 ripe avocado
1 ripe tomato
olive oil
juice of one lime
kosher salt

chili powder (optional)

Directions:
Stem kale, and slice into ribbons about 1/4-1/2″ thick.  Place into large bowl.  Scoop the flesh of the avocado into the bowl.  Add a healthy glug of olive oil (about 1-2 Tbsp? – I don’t measure), the lime juice, about 1 tsp of salt, and a pinch of chili powder if using.  Mix well with your hands – get the avocado mushed evenly into the kale.   Dice the tomato and gently toss.  Enjoy!

A Simple Sauce

by Marykate Smith Despres, Salem Depot

For someone who doesn’t like tomatoes, my husband makes a mean sauce. Sauce, or red gravy as my grandmother calls it, is the only way he’ll eat the delicious fruit that I will gladly nosh right off the vine, or in big juicy bites interrupted only by a pause to wipe my mouth or add another shake of salt.

Like the good grandchildren of Italian grandmothers that we are, both he and I will claim that our respective grandmother’s sauce is, or was, the best. Both matriarchs could be called purists when it comes to the stuff and both grandchildren would gladly and forever eat heaping plates of it ladled over manicotti, baked in ziti, or, if we were lucky, off a wooden spoon come straight from the pot. He will tell the story of the giant ziplock bags of his nana’s sauce sent to school with him at the end of visits home from college, and I of the time my grandma ate red gravy from a jar and spoke of it only while crossing herself and rolling her eyes skyward in apology to her mother.

With such seriuos sauce legacies looming, my husband would be hard-pressed to call his sauce anything other than something fast and easy to do for dinner, but he is too modest. It is a very different sauce from the ones we are used to, but that is as it should be. He uses fresh tomatoes, adds vegetables rather than meat, and cooks it quickly in a pan instead of all day in the pot, enabling each ingredient to maintain it’s individual form and flavor yet still marry with the rest. Just like our grandmothers, however, it is made in the throw in some of this and a little of that form, so this recipe is an eavesdropper’s approximation of a particular evening’s version.

You’ll need:

about 4 tomatoes (or slightly more tomatoes than green beans), diced

1/2 lb green beans, trimmed

6 – 8 oz white mushrooms, chopped

1 clove garlic, minced

3-5 leaves fresh basil, torn

salt and pepper to taste

Combine tomatoes, garlic and basil in a pan over medium low heat. Shake in a little salt and pepper. Add mushrooms and cook until they begin to soften. The beans are last. Cook it all a minute or two more. Serve over your choice of pasta.

 

Anna Thomas’s Gazpacho

by Nina Cohen, Salem Depot

Vegetarians who love to entertain have relied on Anna Thomas’s classic The Vegetarian Epicure since it was published in 1972. Her recipes combine farm-fresh ingredients, rich stocks and balanced flavoring. They never disappoint.

Peel, seed and chop:
1 small onion
1 cucumber
1 bell pepper
3 ripe tomatoes
1 chili pepper

Blend vegetables in blender and add:
2 eggs
1/3 C olive oil
¼ C vinegar
1 C tomato juice
2 cloves garlic, raw or roasted
2 T lemon juice
1-2 T brown sugar

This is where it gets weird. The Gazpacho is heated before it’s chilled, the eggs set
slightly and the soup takes on a thick and layered flavor.

Pour the mixture from the blender into a heavy-bottom pot and heat very slowly,
stirring with a wire whisk for 3 or 4 minutes. Take it off the heat and continue stirring
occasionally as it cools.

If desired, add 2 T mayonnaise when the soup has cooled, whirring it in the blender to
combine thoroughly.

Serve chilled, garnished with colorful chopped tomato or red pepper or croutons.

Tomato Pie!

by Marykate Smith Despres, Salem Depot

Although I could happily slice and eat the heirloom tomatoes I got in my share this week just as they are, I always love an excuse to make pie. If you ordered pie crusts from the Coop last month, this savory, summer pie is worth pulling one out of the freezer.

If you don’t have a crust on hand, don’t worry! You can very quickly and easily make a savory pie crust by simply combining 1 cup of flour with 1/2 teaspoon salt, 1/4 cup of olive oil, and 1/4 cup of ice water and then pressing the mixture into an 9 inch pie plate. Stick it in the fridge for 15-20 minutes while gathering the rest of your ingredients, then score it and par bake for 10-15 minutes or until it begins to brown, but not crisp. I use this recipe for quiche and other savory pies when I have limited time and ingredients on hand and think the olive oil base (rather than butter) would be a great compliment to the tomatoes.

Remember the tomatoes?

This recipe is adapted from the Tomato-Parmesan Custard Pie recipe in Ron Silver and Jen Bervin’s Bubby’s Homamade Pies. The book, and all recipes therein, spring from the institution. If you can’t swing a trip to NYC to visit the Bubby’s, or if you simply prefer recreating these famous flavors in your own kitchen, I highly recommend the book.

 

But back to the pie. Besides the crust, you’ll need:

3/4 cups heavy cream

1/4 cup buttermilk

2 large eggs

1 cup grated Parmesan cheese, divided

1 teaspoon salt

1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

pinch ground nutmeg

2 pounds tomatoes

 

Preheat the oven to 350.

Wisk liquids and eggs and add your spices and 3/4 cup of the Parmesan.

Cut tomatoes into 1/4 inch slices and layer in your crust (which you baked and cooled earlier), setting aside a few choice slices of tomato for the top. Add the custard mixture and then gently top with saved tomato slices and 1/4 cup of cheese.

Bake for about 40 minutes until the filling sets. Cool to room temperature, slice, and serve.